Point Pelee National Park is getting $2 million to help restore its marsh. July 11, 2019. (Photo courtesy of Point Pelee National Park)

Point Pelee marsh is getting a health injection

Point Pelee National Park is getting millions to help restore its marsh.

The minister of Environment and Climate Change and minister responsible for Parks Canada has announced $2 million to benefit both conservation efforts and visitor experience.

This collaborative project between Parks Canada and the Caldwell and Walpole Island First Nations, along with other regional experts, will support efforts to restore the diversity and overall health of the marsh.

The project will also improve the visitor experience to this internationally significant wetland by expanding canoe routes, improving viewscapes and providing increased educational opportunities for visitors.

Work on the marsh boardwalk area was finished in the spring and included replacing 500 metres of the boardwalk with a new wood and metal design, installing new slip-resistant tower steps, and renaturalizing some areas of the marsh to benefit fish, turtles, and other wildlife.

Work on the marsh boardwalk area was finished in the spring and included replacing 500 metres of the boardwalk with a new wood and metal design, installing new slip-resistant tower steps, and renaturalising some areas of the marsh to benefit fish, turtles, and other wildlife. July 11, 2019. (Photo courtesy of Point Pelee National Park)

Work on the marsh boardwalk area was finished in the spring and included replacing 500 metres of the boardwalk with a new wood and metal design, installing new slip-resistant tower steps, and renaturalizing some areas of the marsh to benefit fish, turtles, and other wildlife. July 11, 2019. (Photo courtesy of Point Pelee National Park)

“By investing in and protecting more of our nature, Point Pelee National Park in collaboration with Indigenous partners and other regional experts is preserving our treasured places and connecting more Canadians to the outdoors,” said Environment Minister Catherine McKenna. “These projects will help save habitats of species at risk and improve ecological integrity in this internationally significant wetland.”