Tanner Steffler Foundation logo. (Provided by the Tanner Steffler Foundation)

Tanner Steffler Foundation Makes Presentation To Huron County Council

The parents of Tanner Steffler made a presentation to Huron County Council on Wednesday.

Tanner Steffler lost his life this past August at the age of 19 to mental health and substance use disorder, specifically opioid addiction. John and Heather Steffler are asking the county for support in raising awareness of the problem in Huron County and finding a Huron County solution. John told council they’re working with the OPP, the school boards and the existing service agencies to better impact our youth in Huron County and focus specifically on Huron County. Steffler says the model they’re looking at exists now in Shelburne.

It’s the Pine River Institute and it’s an evidence-based system and patients stay there for as long as 15 months, but at this time there is a waiting list of over a year to get in. Steffler says one of the problems in Huron County now is there are too many agencies all doing the same thing so it’s difficult for a person seeking help to know where to go. Another problem is that once the GTA and other larger urban centres are looked after there isn’t much provincial funding left for Huron County. Staff have been asked to prepare a report to bring back to council.

“Our plan is to work with the OPP, the school boards, the existing service agencies to better impact our youth in Huron County and focus only on Huron County. The big goal is to have a treatment facility, treatment based, evidence based, that will eventually become a trademark of Huron County.”

“The model that we’re looking at is up in Shelburne. It’s the Pine River Institute and it’s funded by the Local Health Integration Network, its funded by the Upper Grand School Board and its funded privately as well. It’s an evidence-based system and right now there’s over a year wait to get in.”