Water Wells First Spokesperson Kevin Jakubec speaking to members of the AECOM panel. April 11, 2017. (Photo by Natalia Vega)

Activist Group Threatens To Boycott Samsung

Water Wells First is threatening to boycott all Samsung products on Earth Day (April 22), over fears of what may happen to the aquifer once wind turbines go up in North Kent.

The activist group is looking to stop the construction of the North Kent Wind project  (which is owned by Samsung and Pattern Energy) so tests can be done on local water wells. The group claims that the vibrations caused by the construction and operation of wind turbines is why several residents in Dover Township have black well water.

Water Wells First spokesperson Kevin Jakubec mentioned the boycott to a panel of AECOM committee members at a public meeting on April 11.

Water Wells First threatens to boycott Samsung products on Earth Day. April 11, 2017. (Photo by Natalia Vega)

Water Wells First threatens to boycott Samsung products on Earth Day. April 11, 2017. (Photo by Natalia Vega)

The meeting was originally set to start at 6pm at the Country View Golf Course. However, the meeting didn’t get back on track until after a break was called around 7pm. The break was called when tension rose between Jakubec and committee members.

Ahead of the meeting, Water Wells First posted on Facebook that the AECOM committee members were “hand-picked by AECOM… to cater to the interests of Samsung and Pattern.”

Peter Hensel says the people on the committee don’t care about the locals or their concerns.

“They’re people who were brought in to talk about something they know nothing about because they obviously haven’t been around any of the wells that have been contaminated by their turbines,” says Hensel. “I think those turbines really need to [stop operating] right now — maybe the aquifer will recover and maybe it’s already too late.”

Water Wells First supporters at a public meeting with the AECOM panel. April 11, 2017. (Photo by Natalia Vega)

Water Wells First supporters at a public meeting with the AECOM panel. April 11, 2017. (Photo by Natalia Vega)

Hensel says his well water was fine in 2012 when he had an analysis done. However, in 2016 Hensel says the analysis showed that six elements including uranium, arsenic, and lead were at or above the Ontario Drinking-Water Quality Standards.

Dover Township resident, Mark St. Pierre, says he and his family have been experiencing black well water for the past three years.

“We’ve been trying to filter it out,” he says. “We’re still using it for everything but drinking and cooking.”

St. Pierre says they have to use their well water for washing clothes and bathing, but now he fears it’s taking a toll on their health.

“We’re starting to get strange things happen to our skin,” he says. “We’re getting sores where you normally never would have sores.”

BlackburnNews.com was told at the meeting that members of the committee could not speak to media and was instead told to contact Pattern Energy. BlackburnNews.com then reached out to Pattern Energy but has not yet received a reply.